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Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Developers Reveal Proposal for 620 Broadway

In a packed DAV, developers revealed their ideas of how to transform 620 Broadway from a gas station and convenience mart to a transit-oriented, high-rent residential development ready for the Green Line Station set to be constructed just up the street in Ball Square.

The 19-unit project has not been formally presented to the City, but developers, along with their attorney and architect, felt it prudent to give abutters and members of the DAV a first-hand look at what they envision as a great addition to the streetscape of Broadway.

The team will seek three reliefs from the City that include allowing the rear setback, a parking variance to decrease the expected amount of parking spots from 32 to 21 and allowing 19 units with the promise that 2 of the three-bedroom units will be made affordable to help families remain in the City. The parking will be placed underground with two available on the ground level of the 42 foot high building. The developers will also have available bicycle parking.

The units will be rentals, at this point, with the housing market being studied to determine pricing and the possibility of the units being sold as condominiums.

For attendees, parking and the construction schedule in conjunction with MBTA projects slated for the area posed as the top concerns. Ward 5 Alderman Mark Niedergang advised the developing team to communicate with the MBA directly and to not rely, solely, on the City's Planning Department.

Residents from Boston Avenue and members of the DAV voiced serious concerns over a potential parking loss due to residents hosting parties.

Baiting for rodent activity was also mentioned, but seemed content with the news that the site is baited months in advance and for a year following.

The team will be taking all concerns into consideration and will have follow-up meeting before going to the Zoning Board of Appeals.





4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wow, what a really, really horrible street facade. A parking garage door and mostly-blank wall (windows into someone's home?)

And on Broadway, right next to a Green Line station, and yet all residential, no business space?

And of course its shape and siding look completely out of place there. To me it looks the exact opposite of "great addition to the streetscape of Broadway."

Anonymous said...

Wow, what a really, really horrible street facade. A parking garage door and mostly-blank wall (windows into someone's home?)

And on Broadway, right next to a Green Line station, and yet all residential, no business space?

And of course its shape and siding look completely out of place there. To me it looks the exact opposite of "great addition to the streetscape of Broadway."

Anonymous said...

I absolutely do not want a commercial space there. It would not be fair to the businesses in Ball Square and would cause more of a parking headache. The design looks odd but the business across the street looks odd too.

Anonymous said...

As I understood it-this is not the definite color or style of the building. They just wanted a rendering to show attendees and compare to the rest of the streetscape. I would also oppose a commercial space because of surrounding businesses.